Historical Literacy and Public History, Part 2

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My first experience doing public history was in third grade, when I dressed up as Miles Standish to do a book report of a biography I'd read about him (yes, I was the only girl in my class to read about and dress up as a male). Looking back, I know that what I was wearing was not even close to correct as far as what Standish would have actually worn. But the experience--and even some facts about Standish--have remained with me despite the inaccuracy of my costume. My other vivid memory of history was becoming a junior ranger at Jamestown and Yorktown National Park Service sites. I remember having to card wool, identify tools, and other somewhat mundane (to an adult) things. I'm sure that the rangers there made…
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Historical Literacy and Public History, Part 1

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Historians and political pundits often lament the woeful historical ignorance of the public. They claim that the lack of historical knowledge causes people to make bad political choices or appreciate their country less than they should. But I wonder whether the ignorance of the American public about history (which I'm not disputing) has the profound political ramifications that so many pundits claim. For the final paper for Issues and Problems in Public History, our professor asked us to write a paper that synthesized our readings into an argument about how the mythic past and historical memory propel the practices of public history. Working on this paper made me think about how history really functions, at least in the United States. What follows is the theoretical background for a couple of future…
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