Bibliography

The books and articles on this list are most of what we’ll be reading this semester. We may end up adding or changing a few; there are also podcasts, videos, and digital projects in the weekly agendas that aren’t reflected here.

Armstrong, Benjamin. Small Boats and Daring Men: Maritime Raiding, Irregular Warfare, and the Early American Navy. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 2019.

Brown, Marvin L., and Marta Huth. “Saratoga.” In Baroness von Riedesel and the American Revolution: Journal and Correspondence of a Tour of Duty, 1776-1783, 47–67. University of North Carolina Press, 1965. https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9780807839539_brown.15.

Burnard, Trevor. “A Passion for Places: The Geographic Turn in Early American History.” Commonplace, July 2008. http://commonplace.online/article/a-passion-for-places/.

Eustace, Nicole. “Demographic Strategies and the Defeat of Tecumseh: MORAVIANTOWN, CANADA, OCTOBER 1813.” In 1812, 118–67. War and the Passions of Patriotism. University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012. https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt3fj70n.7.

Hattendorf, John B. “Debating the Purpose of a Navy in a New Republic: The United States of America, 1775–1815.” In Ideologies of Western Naval Power, c. 1500–1815, 1st ed., 280–299. Routledge, 2020. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429316814-16.

Inskeep, Steve. Jacksonland: President Andrew Jackson, Cherokee Chief John Ross, and a Great American Land Grab. New York, New York: Penguin Press, 2015.

Karp, Matthew J. “Slavery and American Sea Power: The Navalist Impulse in the Antebellum South.” The Journal of Southern History 77, no. 2 (2011): 283–324.

Ostler, Jeffrey. “Just and Lawful Wars, 1783–1795.” In Surviving Genocide, 82–122. Native Nations and the United States from the American Revolution to Bleeding Kansas. Yale University Press, 2019. https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctvgc629z.7.

Smith, Jason W. To Master the Boundless Sea: The U.S. Navy, the Marine Environment, and the Cartography of Empire. Flows, Migrations, and Exchanges. The University of North Carolina Press, 2018. https://doi.org/10.5149/9781469640464_smith.

Sneff, Emily. “Episode 208: Nathaniel Philbrick, Turning Points of the American Revolution.” Ben Franklin’s World. Accessed July 27, 2020. https://benfranklinsworld.com/episode-208-nathaniel-philbrick-turning-points-of-the-american-revolution/.

Sofka, James R. “The Jeffersonian Idea of National Security: Commerce, the Atlantic Balance of Power, and the Barbary War, 1786–1805.” Diplomatic History 21, no. 4 (October 1, 1997): 519–44. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-7709.00087.

———. “‘“The Jeffersonian Idea of National Security” Revisited.’” In Rough Waters: American Involvement with the Mediterranean in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries, edited by James R. Sofka, Silvia Marzagalli, and John J. McCusker, 161–84. . Liverpool University Press, 2010. https://doi.org/10.2307/j.ctt21pxjs0.14.

Van Sickle, Eugene S. “Reluctant Imperialists: The U.S. Navy and Liberia, 1819—1845.” Journal of the Early Republic 31, no. 1 (2011): 107–34.

Watson, Samuel. “Military Learning and Adaptation Shaped by Social Context: The U.S. Army and Its ‘Indian Wars,’ 1790-1890.” Journal of Military History 82, no. 2 (April 2018): 373–438.

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