Passing on the Scissors and the Quill

Digital Humanities, NULab, Viral Texts
Faithful readers of this blog (all one of you) will notice that I haven't posted in almost a year. It's not that I've had nothing interesting to say, but rather that I've been too busy with those interesting things to write about them for the blog. Here's a brief rundown. In the summer of 2014, my family moved to Fairfax, VA, when my husband was hired by George Mason University. For the 2014-2015 school year, I commuted to Boston from Virginia almost every week so I could finish my coursework at Northeastern University. In August 2015, I passed my comprehensive exams and defended my dissertation proposal, officially becoming a PhD candidate. For the past year, I've been researching and writing my dissertation, as well as continuing to work on the Viral…
Read More

On Newspapers and Being Human

Digital Humanities, NULab, Viral Texts
Last week, an opinion piece appeared in the New York Times, arguing that the advent of algorithmically derived human-readable content may be destroying our humanity, as the lines between technology and humanity blur. A particular target in this article is the advent of "robo-journalism," or the use of algorithms to write copy for the news.[ref]The article also decries other types of algorithmically derived texts, but the case for computer-generated creative fiction or poetry is fairly well argued by people such as Mark Sample, and is not an argument that I have anything new to add to.[/ref] The author cites a study that alleges that "90 percent of news could be algorithmically generated by the mid-2020s, much of it without human intervention." The obvious rebuttal to this statement is that algorithms are…
Read More